VanValkenburgh-Vollick-in-Canada
A collaborative genealogy of VanValkenburgh branches in Canada
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101
VanVolkenburgh Hunting Camp, Crowe River / Whetstone Lake, Hastings Co., undated.
VanVolkenburgh Hunting Camp, Crowe River / Whetstone Lake, Hastings Co., undated.
An undated photo of VV family and friends at a hunting camp in Lake Twp., Hastings Co. to the north and east of the family home at Cordova Mines, Ontario.

Submitted by Wayne VanVolkenburg: "Milo's Hunting Camp", John VV (senior) is second from the right. The hunting camp is below Whetstone Lake on the Crowe River. The VanVolkenburgh family (likely Simon) had a 100 year lease on Crown land where they built this hunting camp. I believe that other Trent River relatives joined them to hunt there. The only time that I went deer hunting was at this camp in 1971. It’s about a six mile walk to the camp!
 
102
Vollick Family Reunion, 1939.
Vollick Family Reunion, 1939.
Half of the 1939 Vollick Family Reunion at Wasaga Beach, Ontario. Canada.

Front Row # 1 #2 # 3 Kenneth Robinson #4 Peter Robinson #5 #6 #7 #8, 9, Russell Cornelius Vollick,10 James Russell Eugene Vollick

2nd Row 1,2 ,3 ,4 ,5 Stuart Vollick,6 ,7 8, 9 ,10, 11,12,13,14

3rd row 1,2 Lila Vollick Robinson,3,4,5,6, 7,William Mac Millan Vollick,8, Anna Mary Vollick, 9,Walter James Vollick,10,11,12,13

4th Row 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,

5th row 1,2,3,4,5 Melinda Vollick,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15
 
103
vv-john-Iowa-bio.jpg
vv-john-Iowa-bio.jpg
 
104
VV-Wm-Melzor-in-1915.jpg
VV-Wm-Melzor-in-1915.jpg
 
105
Wellington Van (1869- ) and wife Edith Elliot (1875- )
Wellington Van (1869- ) and wife Edith Elliot (1875- )
From "Our Treasured Past", Borden, Saskatchewan & District Historical Assoc., 1980.
 
106
Window Eight
Window Eight
The final window in the series of eight is called Returning Home. The images in this window are meant to symbolize hope. The image of the tepee, a lodge of hope, illustrates the resting place in the spirit world, and the trillium’s three petals represent the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. In the foreground is an image of the ascended Lord with two human figures kneeling before him. The figure on the left is the mother of the Ongwehowenh people, offering thanks to the Earth. The figure on the right offers the wampum to communicate gratitude and respect.
 
107
Window Five
Window Five
The fifth window in the narrative is Consecration of the Chapel, which is intended to commemorate the dedication and commitment of the original missionaries who worked with the First Nations peoples. This window shows Reverend Robert Lugger welcoming the Right Reverend James Stewart to the consecration of the Mohawk Chapel in 1830. Various icons in the window honour the efforts of missionaries and the Masonic Order. Also depicted in this window is the Chapel Bell, which depicts the bell that now hangs at the front entrance to the Chapel – the first bell to hung in Upper Canada!
 
108
Window Four
Window Four
The final window on the left wall is Reunion of Old Friends (image left). This window shows Joseph Brant reuniting in 1788 with Reverend John Stuart, a friend and ally from when they both lived in Mohawk Valley. This window also shows the symbols of the British flag (to represent the alliance between Brant and the British), the Two Row Wampum of the Rotinonson:ni, and the symbol of the Masonic Order to pay homage to the fact that Brant and many other settlers were Masons.
 
109
Window One
Window One
The first window is, The Great Peace. It tells the story of the political unification of the Confederacy of the Five Nations: Senecas, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Mohawks (also called the Rotinonson:ni Confederacy). In the window, the Peacemaker stands in front of a White Pine tree (the Tree of Peace), and representatives from each of the Five Nations, as well as his spokesperson, Hiawatha, sit around him. Also included in this window is the Five Nation Flag, including the image of a wampum belt, showing the Nations aligned.
 
110
Window Seven
Window Seven
The seventh window is Residential School Days. This window communicates the role of education in the lives of the Six Nations. In this window, the late Miss Susan Hardie sits in front of the Mohawk Institute Indian Residential School, surrounded by students. The first Mohawk Institute started in 1831, and was across the road from the Chapel. In 1854, it was transferred to its present location (now Woodland Cultural Centre), suffered a fire in 1903, and was rebuilt a year later. The school closed on June 30, 1970. This tranquil scene contradicts the history of residential schools, when Indigenous languages and cultures were challenged.
 
111
Window Six
Window Six
The sixth window number The Queen’s Window, which has this title because Queen Elizabeth II granted permission to include the image of the Royal Cypher in this window. This window illustrates the distribution of the Gospels in the Mohawk language, and commemorates the work of Captain John Norton (who was responsible for the translation), and the work of the Foreign Bible Society. The window depicts Rotinonson:ni catechist passing out portions of the translated scripture from the sanctuary steps
 
112
Window Three
Window Three
The Arrival of Brant is the third window on the left wall. Joseph Brant, also known as Thayendanegea, leads his followers across Lake Ontario in this stained glass window. In the late 1770s, Europeans began to encroach onto the Mohawk Valley, and the American Revolutionary War caused additional friction. After the war, the Mohawks who remained loyal to the British Crown were forced to relocate north to Upper Canada, setting up villages along the Grand River; Brant established his home in the present day Brantford. The window also includes an arrow pointing upward, with droplets of red blood; this arrow is a symbol for the idea that uncontrolled anger (i.e. shooting an arrow into the sky) results in tragedy.
 
113
Window Two.jpg
Window Two.jpg
The Queen Anne Window is the second window in the story. The window illustrates four Six Nations Chiefs meeting Her Majesty, Queen Anne, in England in 1710. Peter Schuyler, Mayor of the Town of Albany, introduced the Chiefs to the Queen, wishing to encourage them to remain allied to the British military cause. This meeting led to the building of Her Majesty’s Royal Chapel of the Mohawks – the only Royal Chapel that exists outside of the United Kingdom. The original log building was commissioned in 1711, and the Queen provided a silver communion service and a bible, along with other furnishings. The window shows symbols of the Six Nations aligned with a cross, a small chapel, and ships that symbolize the trip from the Old World to the New.
 

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